US to Hong Kong Power Adapter: What Plug Do I Need in Hong Kong? (2021)

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Updated on March 5, 2021 by Asher Fergusson

Info on power adapter plugs for Hong Kong

Jam-packed with towering skyscrapers and glitzy malls, many regard the modern metropolis of Hong Kong to be Asia’s most vibrant and international city. Dispersed among its bustling streets lie countless captivating cultural attractions and tasty culinary offerings, enough to entice even the most intrepid traveler to get out there and explore. Frantic and full of color, you’ll need a properly charged battery to make the most of your time in the city. Here’s everything you need to know about purchasing a power adapter for Hong Kong.

Which power outlets do they use in Hong Kong?

Given that Hong Kong only recently became independent from Britain after 156 years, it should come as no surprise to learn that the autonomous territory uses the UK style Type G power outlet.

These sockets have three rectangular holes, including a ground. Power outlets are generally well constructed in Hong Kong, although some may be flimsy and unsafe so always use your best judgment.

What kind of power adapter do I need for Hong Kong?

If you’re traveling to Hong Kong for the first time you might be asking yourself “What plug do I need for Hong Kong?” Americans visiting Hong Kong are going to need a Type A/B to Type G adapter, which is also commonly known as a North America to United Kingdom adapter. The input should fit American plugs, while the output should have the UK style triple square-shaped prongs.

We recommend this Universal Adapter for its clever design and the fact that it will have you covered in Hong Kong and 100+ countries around the world.

View on Amazon.com ➜

What’s the electricity and power supply like in Hong Kong?

Hong Kong runs on 220V and 50Hz, which differs from the USA.
As a result, any devices that are not dual voltage will require a power converter to charge in Hong Kong.

Despite its immense population density (Hong Kong has the highest concentration of skyscrapers on Earth), the territory manages to run a remarkably reliable electrical system. Blackouts and power surges are rare.

Do I Need A Voltage Converter In Hong Kong?

Although Hong Kong runs on a different voltage and frequency, most travelers don’t need a converter because the vast majority of portable devices are dual voltage. Effectively, that means you can charge them on either system without issue. One common exception, however, is the hairdryer which tends to run on a fixed voltage. If in doubt, always check the label for the text “100/240V, 50/60Hz.” Otherwise, you risk frying your device.

Other Hong Kong Packing List Items

In addition to your US to Hong Kong power adapter these items will help you on your travels:


  1. Packing Cubes
  2. It’s hard to stay organized on the road, especially when you’re in the habit of haphazardly throwing your clothing all around the hotel room. But there is a solution to this common travel conundrum: the humble packing cube. These lightweight foldable cubes allow you to store each article of clothing together so that you can quickly find exactly what you need.

    View on Amazon.com ➜


  3. A Lip-Stick Sized Charger
  4. Whether you’re on the hunt for the best dim sum in the city or snapping a selfie from the ferry on Victoria Harbor, you’re going to need a fully charged battery at all times in Hong Kong. And the best way to stay charged on the road is to carry a portable power bank, preferably a lipstick-sized one that you can slip into your pocket or purse.

    View on Amazon.com ➜


  5. Windproof Travel Umbrella
  6. It can rain frequently in Hong Kong, particularly from April to October so we recommend packing a compact travel umbrella that will have you prepared. This one is a reliably well-constructed travel umbrella that comes with a zip-case that will keep your wet umbrella from soaking your other belongings.

    View on Amazon.com ➜


  7. Neck Wallet / Passport Pouch
  8. neck walletAlthough perhaps not as prevalent as other parts of Asia, pickpockets can and do rob tourists in the streets of Hong Kong. And given how crowded the city is, it’s highly unlikely you’ll notice before it’s too late.

    With that in mind, it’s wise to invest in a neck wallet before your trip. Made from lightweight and breathable materials, these handy contraptions slide discreetly under your shirt to keep your valuables safe from prying hands.

    View on Amazon.com ➜


  9. Jet lag Relief Pills
  10. The time difference between the USA and Hong Kong is around 10 hours. Therefore, you’ll undoubtedly be feeling a little worse for wear upon arrival. Don’t let the first day of your precious vacation go to waste. A dose of jet lag relief pills will leave you feeling perky enough to get out there sooner.

    View on Amazon.com ➜


  11. Virtual Private Network (VPN)
  12. Cybercrime is an enormous problem throughout the world, and Hong Kong is certainly no exception. If you plan on using WiFi while you’re away, there’s a good chance a hacker could compromise the network to steal your sensitive information. Thankfully, you can use a VPN to encrypt your traffic and ensure your bank details remain safe and sound.

    View options at NordVPN.com ➜


  13. Travel Insurance for Hong Kong
  14. Even though Hong Kong is a relatively safe country, accidents can happen anywhere in the world. And if you find yourself in a situation where you need emergency medical care, then the eye-watering bill of a reputable private hospital in Hong Kong would be enough to send most people broke. Don’t take the risk. Grab yourself a suitable travel insurance policy to cover any unexpected incidents that could arise.

    View their plans at WorldNomads.com ➜

Other FAQs about traveling in Hong Kong


1. When to Travel to Hong Kong

For the avid culture vulture, the best time to visit Hong Kong is between December and February when the city comes alive with a selection of fun-filled festivals. Hong Kong puts on the most spectacular Spring Lantern Festival in all of Asia. An epic lanterns display enchants onlookers of all ages while traditional song and dance overrun the streets. Chinese New Year is a blast as truckloads of firecrackers light up the sky, although hotels and airfares can be hard to come by as the masses all attempt to travel at once.

Believe it or not, Hong Kong also does one of the most joyous and colorful Christmas celebrations in the world, perhaps second only to New York. For the shopaholic, the sale seasons are the best time to get their retail therapy fix. The winter sales take place between December and February, while the summer sales run from July to September. Be sure to check current Hong Kong travel advisories before you go.


2. What’s the weather like in Hong Kong?

On the whole, Hong Kong is a warm and humid city that receives a heck of a lot of annual rainfall. The best weather in Hong Kong is from October to early December when you can expect plenty of sunshine and a relatively cool climate that isn’t overly humid. May to September is hot, muggy, and sees plenty of rain, especially in August when the skies tend to open up almost every day.


3. What to do in Hong Kong

Long regarded as the gateway between East and West, Hong Kong is a melting pot of culture and tradition. British influence runs deep through its financial heart, while Chinese customs still reign supreme in the rituals of everyday life. But for many, Hong Kong is a place to shop ‘til you drop. Strip malls cover a comical proportion of the city, with glamorous options such as Pacific Place and Times Square competing fiercely for their slice of the pie.

For a more exciting shopping experience, outdoor markets such as Temple Street are heaven for the savvy bargain hunter.

Food is another major drawing card in Hong Kong, with an array of mouth-watering restaurants to suit every budget and taste. Low-cost travelers could snap up a gastronomic bargain at Tim Ho Wan, where Michelin Star rated dumplings sell for just a couple of dollars per plate. For a sweeping city view with a spiritual twist, the Tian Tan Buddha is well worth the 268 steps it takes to reach the top. If that sounds like a bit much, then the Peak Tram leads lazy travelers to a magnificent panorama at the Sky Terrace 428.

The best way to appreciate the city skyline, however, is from the deck of the Star Ferry on Victoria Harbour. Ideally, aim to be on the water at 8 p.m as the daily Symphony of Lights laser show brightens up the sky. Traveling families can keep the kids entertained with a day out at Disney Land or Ocean Park. For a less family-friendly environment, make your way to Happy Valley on race day to drink and gamble on the horses to your heart’s content.

For a taste of traditional Hong Kong, the raised wooden houses in the nearby Tai O village have remained mostly unchanged over the centuries. Of course, no holiday in Hong Kong would be complete without a trip up the mid-level escalators. As the world’s longest outdoor escalator, the council installed this unique transportation system to help fatigued office workers navigate the hilly terrain.


4. How to Get Around in Hong Kong

Hong Kong boasts a world-class public transportation system, which is just as well considering the sheer number of people that inhabit the city. The highlight is the hyper-efficient Mass Transit Railway that whisks cramped commuters around the city at breakneck speeds. When the subway doesn’t suit, city buses are easy enough to navigate with the right app, and an affordable Uber is rarely more than a few minutes away.

Be sure to take a ride on the Star Ferry while in town to enjoy a super cheap panoramic view of the city’s world-famous skyline.

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