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17 Top Estonia Packing List Items for 2022 + What to Wear & NOT to Bring

what to pack for estonia
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This compact country boasts Medieval castles, seaside port towns, enriching forests, and a touch of Nordic culture all within its humble borders. Often left in the shadows to some of its larger, more popular neighbors, Estonia is truly one of Europe’s most underrated gems.

This Baltic nation is on a pledge to become the most organic country, but they’re also just as interested in their highly innovative technology. Did you know that Skype was created in Estonia? You may have heard of its capital city, Tallin, but Estonia is much more than that. Below, you’ll find a list of our essential and most coveted items to include when packing for a trip to Estonia this year.

What to Pack for Estonia – 17 Essentials

  • 1. Packing Cubes

    Packing cubes are a traveler’s best friend. I use them whether I’m packing for a three-day trip or a three-week one. The amount of compression and organization they offer you is second to none when you’re living out of a suitcase. So say goodbye to rummaging around a messy suitcase and say hello to easy, organized living when on the road.

  • 2. Packable Rain Jacket

    Estonia’s temperate and relatively mild climate during most of the year is all thanks to its proximity to the Baltic Sea. The air can be humid in the spring and summer, and you’ll likely encounter a light rain or two while you’re there. Just throw this lightweight rain jacket into your backpack so you’ll never be caught in a downpour without it.

  • 3. Travel Power Adapter

    Estonia operates on a 230 voltage, as does most of Europe. They also utilize the type F, C, or E plug that has two cylindrical prongs. If you are coming from the United States, you will undoubtedly need a power adaptor to use everything from your phone to a curling iron. This particular power adapter is super compact and is equipped with everything you need to seamlessly use your electronics abroad.

  • 4. Day Pack

    Some of my best days while traveling are the ones when I get to meander through a new city. Need a water bottle? Throw it in your backpack. Chance of rain? Pack your rain jacket. Snacks, portable charger, extra space for souvenirs? You guessed it. Bring a solid day pack like this one for all your day-to-day essentials when out and about.

  • 5. Windproof Travel Umbrella

    I’ve had several umbrellas over the years that usually end up in the trash after collapsing and breaking during a strong gust of wind. Not this one! This umbrella is built to withstand those less-than-pleasant blustery days. Its sturdy design will ensure that you’re not only protected from the rain, but also shielded from the wind. This is a great item to have when in Estonia due to your proximity to the (sometimes) unpredictable Baltic Sea weather.

  • 6. Lipstick-Sized Portable Charger

    I do not go anywhere without my portable charger. When in a new place, I’ve got my Google maps running, I’m snapping photos, and I’m scrolling through resources online to find the best cafes. This will, unfortunately, drain your phone’s battery. This small charger is slim enough to stick in your purse, a backpack, or even your coat pocket. Don’t risk having a dead phone when you can take this lipstick-sized charger wherever you go.

  • 7. Waterproof Phone Case

    If you’re going to put a case on your phone, you might as well make it a waterproof one like this! Estonia is filled with lakes to jump in or explore in a rented boat. You’re also, of course, close to the sea where you can find lots of other water activities. Don’t risk waterlogging your phone if you’re keen to engage in some water adventures.

  • 8. Wool Socks

    If you’re headed to Estonia in the winter (which you should, simply to check out Tallinn’s Christmas market), then you’ll want to pack a good pair of wool socks. Estonia does get snow, even in Tallinn, which is close to the sea. Though most of the year, the weather is mild, the winters can get a bit more severe.

  • 9. Athletic Shoes

    It goes without saying that you’ll want some comfortable shoes if you plan on doing a lot of walking around the city. If you also plan to venture outside of the city to do some hiking or camping, don a pair of solid athletic shoes like these ones to protect your feet and keep you moving.

  • 10. Lifestraw Water Bottle

    Estonia’s tap water is generally safe to drink, but if you are planning on spending some days out in the forests, you’ll want this Lifestraw water bottle. This water bottle will automatically filter your water to rid it of 99.9 percent of all bad bacteria. There’s no need to boil or pump your water if you’ve got this with you. We’d highly recommend it if you’re going to live off the grid for a bit.

  • 11. Warm Hat

    Again, Estonia’s weather is pretty mild for most of the year, but if you’re visiting during the late fall or winter, you’ll see temperatures start to drop. You’re also essentially guaranteed to encounter some snow if you come in the winter. Don’t go without a good, warm hat like this one. Your head (and ears!) will thank you.

  • 12. Wool Base Layers

    Again, another winter essential. Tallinn’s Christmas market is one of the most magical, but it gets cold when you’re out perusing the stalls after the sun sets. Get your warm base layers on underneath your jeans and your jacket, and enjoy the evening out sipping hot cider and snacking on a fresh gingerbread cookie.

  • 13. Quick-Dry Travel Towel

    This is an excellent product to have if you are planning on going camping or hiking when in Estonia. Many of its forests lay untouched, making for a great nature adventure. This Quick-Dry towel is light, durable, and easily packable – and obviously, it dries very quickly, so you can use it again and again.

  • 14. Travel Insurance

    After getting sick in Italy one time and needing to see a doctor, I now never travel without health insurance. Travelinsurance.com is an excellent resource to find available and dependable coverage when abroad. This is especially useful if you are planning on doing any adventurous activities that may increase your risk of injury or illness.

  • 15. Neck Wallet

    Estonia is a very safe country, but I’d rather be safe than sorry when it comes to protecting my valuables. The Neck Wallet is a discrete item that you can wear underneath your shirt to keep things like your passport and credit cards hidden from others around you. If you know you’ll be in a crowded city square, consider slipping your valuable documents into the Neck Wallet to ensure they stay protected.

  • 16. First Aid Kit

    Having a fist aid kit is never a bad idea. This one is specifically designed for travel with its compact design. Even if you don’t plan on doing any camping or hiking, you never know when you might need something out of your first aid kid. I routinely use bandages from mine to cover blisters on my feet from walking all day.

  • 17. Virtual Private Network (VPN)

    This is a big one for any traveler who will be connecting to public Wi-Fi (hello, all of us). Airports, hotels, cafes – they all put our devices at risk when we connect to a public domain. A Virtual Private Network like this one will not only protect you and your computer from cyber insecurities, but it also allows you to essentially hide your location. This is great if you want to continue a series on Netflix that isn’t available in Estonia, for example. You may also find that you can book better deals on flights and hotels if you are using a VPN that is not location-dependent.

What to Wear in Estonia


Estonia has a great blend of many old-world, Medieval-style cities surrounded by vast forests, lakes, and other areas of untouched nature. Many who venture to this northeastern part of Europe are interested in exploring historical cities, but also want to experience the country’s natural beauty.

For that reason, I would suggest bringing some nice outfits that would be suitable for dinners out, but I would also balance that with practical items that would allow you to take a great hike. If you’re coming for Tallinn’s famous Christmas market, don’t forget your warm layers either!


What Should WOMEN Wear in Estonia? – (Click to expand)

Below is a sample men’s clothing list. (All items link to Amazon.com for your convenience).

As a female traveler, I want options when it comes to my wardrobe. I always bring some items that can be dressy, but I also always bring other items that are comfy. If you come in the spring or summer, bring your sandals, leggings, T-shirts, rain jacket, and a swimsuit. If coming for the Christmas market in December, pack some wool items like a hat, gloves, and base layers.

What Should MEN Wear in Estonia? – (Click to expand)

Below is a sample women’s clothing list. (All items link to Amazon.com for your convenience).

Just like clothing items for women, guys will want a blend of a few nicer outfits for dinners and drinks but will also want practical, athletic gear for walking around cities or exploring nature. Don’t forget your swim trunks, as you’ve got the option of jumping in the Baltic Sea or one of Estonia’s many fresh water lakes.

Dressing for the Seasons

SPRING – March, April, May


Early spring in Estonia is still trying to fight its way out of Winter. Weather can be fickle with showers and still some snowfall and strong winds. April usually brings warmer temperatures with snow and ice melting from the sea and lakes. I would absolutely bring a rain jacket in the spring, but I wouldn’t necessarily pack my thick winter coat any longer. Instead, bring some wool base layers to wear under that rain jacket if the temperatures drop a bit when you’re there.

Average temperatures range from 32 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit as you progress from March to May.


SUMMER – June, July, August

Summers in Estonia are mild but still warm. Coastal areas often carry a cool sea breeze and will bring slightly more humid conditions. July is peak swimming season, so you’ll definitely want your swimsuit for a summer trip. If you’re into camping, this is the season to do it. Bring your good hiking shoes and athletic pants in addition to any other essential camping gear.

You’ll find temperatures hovering around the mid to high 60’s degrees Fahrenheit for most of the summer.

FALL – September, October, November


September and October are lovely months in Estonia. Temperatures remain fairly mild with a mix of warmer days and drizzly days. You’ll start to see bursts of fall colors in all the foliage. Jeans, a warm hat, and a cozy sweater are perfect for this time of year. November temperatures begin to drop significantly, however. If you’re coming during this time, you’ll probably want your winter coat and boots.

September and October will bring you highs in the 50s, but November temperatures will drop into the 30s.


Winter – December, January, February

Mid-winter temperatures in Estonia can be harsh. Snow will start to fall in December, and it may stick around until March. Daylight hours dip to just six hours per day, and with increasingly icy temperatures and conditions, I highly recommend you pack your winter jacket, boots, and all other cold weather clothes.

Winter temperatures will range from the teens to maybe creeping up to 30 degrees Fahrenheit at most.

Dressing Appropriately for the Activity – (Click to expand)

City outings:
Exploring a new city or town means doing a lot of walking that day. Save yourself a pair of sore feet and wear some comfortable walking shoes. I always like to bring a day pack, too, in order to store snacks and water, or in case I find some souvenirs that I’d like to bring home.

Camping/trekking:
You can always rent some of the larger camping items once you’re in Estonia (e.g. a tent or sleeping bag), but there are some smaller and highly packable items out there that are great to bring along. Some of our favorite items include the Quick-Dry travel towel and the Lifestraw water bottle. With these items, you’ll never be left cold, wet, or without clean water. We would, of course, also suggest you wear some solid hiking shoes, general athletic/active clothes, and always pack a warm sweater just in case the temps drop at night.

What NOT to Bring to Estonia

  • 1.DON'T Bring Hairdryer

    The voltage in Europe is basically double that of the U.S. I’m guilty of blowing a fuse in a hotel room by using my own hairdryer. Nowadays, nearly every hotel you’ll stay in will have its own.

  • 2.DON'T Bring Too Much Cash

    Having some cash is nice for markets or street food, but in general, Estonia is a very high-tech society that has no problem using your foreign credit card (in fact, they probably prefer it!).

  • 3.DON'T Bring Clubbing Outfits

    If you’re coming to Estonia, you’re probably not coming for the clubs. And yes, every city will have its own version of nightlight, but if you’re staying in Tallinn, don’t really expect that clubbing scene to be predominant.

  • 4.DON'T Bring Non-Supportive Shoes

    Achy feet are the worst! You’ll be walking, trekking, and exploring a lot when visiting Estonia. Even if you want to bring a pair of sandals in the warmer months, I’d go with a pair of trusty Birkenstocks that have always been super supportive.

  • 5.DON'T Bring Large Bath Towel

    Even if you plan on doing a lot of swimming in Estonia’s lakes, a full-sized towel is just so bulky. Go for our highly recommended Quick-Dry travel towel that will save valuable space in your luggage.

  • 6.DON'T Bring Too Much Stuff

    Don’t overpack. Just don’t do it. You’ll be dragging your own luggage around, and if it exceeds that 50 lb airline limit, you’ll just be paying extra anyway.

What NOT to Wear in Estonia – (Click to expand)

When traveling to Estonia, I wouldn’t ever pack formal or overly fancy clothes (including clubbing outfits). There just isn’t a need for it. And with all of Tallinn’s beautiful cobblestone, I also wouldn’t try walking in heels!

FAQs about Estonia

  • 1. Will I be able to get by speaking English?

    Yes, most Estonians know English well, especially if you are staying in more populated cities. I think it always helps to learn a few helpful phrases in a country’s native language, just to show the locals that you are making an effort. Consider downloading Duolingo to learn the basics of the language. Even though most people speak English, it’s good to go with an open mind and try to interact with people in the local language.

    Will I be able to get by speaking English?
  • 2. What is the main airport in Estonia?

    Lennart Meri Tallinn Airport

  • 3. Is Estonia expensive?

    In general, Estonia’s cost of living is pretty good in comparison to many other European countries. Everyday items tend to be quite affordable, and you’ll often find that you’re spending less than if you were visiting places like Switzerland or Norway. It’s definitely one of the more affordable European countries. If you’re looking to travel on a budget then Estonia is a great place to start in Europe.

    Is Estonia expensive?
  • 4. What currency does Estonia use?

    Estonia is a member of the European Union and uses the Euro.

  • 5. What is the best time of year to visit?

    Estonia has a lot to offer no matter what time of year you choose to visit. I love visiting European Christmas markets in December, so that is my personal favorite! If you enjoy more mild weather, then summer would probably be better. It all depends on what your interests are and your weather preference. I wouldn’t recommend going in winter if you’re trying to escape the cold.

    What is the best time of year to visit?
  • 6. Is Estonia safe?

    Yes, in general, Estonia is a very safe country. However, it’s always a good idea to remain vigilant when out and about, regardless of a country’s low crime rate.

  • 7. Can you see the Northern Lights in Estonia?

    Yes! It is possible to see the Northern Lights while in Estonia. Your best bet is to find a place outside of the city with as little light pollution as possible. It’s a magical experience that I definitely recommend. Nature in Estonia is beautiful so when you venture out to see the lights you’ll also be able to enjoy the beautiful Estonian wilderness.

    Can you see the Northern Lights in Estonia?