17 Top Yellowstone Packing List Items + What NOT to Bring (2018 Update)

Yellowstone is one of the most popular parks in the U.S., and with good reason. This sprawling mass of protected land offers stunning scenery, unique geo-thermal features, and a variety of activities year-round.

If you’ve booked a trip and are now wondering what to pack for Yellowstone, this post covers everything you’ll need.Towards the bottom, you’ll also find a list of things not to bring on your trip, as well as our tips on the best clothes for Yellowstone and some FAQs about visiting the park.

The weather in Yellowstone is unpredictable, and it can get crowded during the popular summer months. Consider patience and adaptability two of the top items on your checklist for traveling to Yellowstone, and you’ll be well on your way to enjoying one of America’s greatest treasures.

What should I bring to Yellowstone National Park?


1) Swimsuit: Women’s and Men’s – Several of the hotels around Yellowstone have pools, and you can swim inside the park at Firehole Canyon in the summer and the Boiling River in the winter. If you think there’s any chance you’ll want to get in the water, don’t forget your swimsuit when packing for Yellowstone.
View on Amazon.com ➜

2) Wool t-shirt: Women’s and Men’s – Wool keeps you cool when it’s hot out and warm when it’s cold, making it one of the best fabrics for wearing outdoors. A wool t-shirt will be comfortable during the summer in Yellowstone and makes the perfect base layer in the winter.
View on Amazon.com ➜

3) Fleece jacket: Women’s and Men’s – Because even the summer weather is unpredictable, a fleece jacket is one of the essentials to take to Yellowstone. You’ll want a jacket in the evenings and at higher elevations, and it’s also ideal as a mid-layer in the winter.
View on Amazon.com ➜

4) Hiking pants: Women’s and Men’s – If you’re visiting Yellowstone, you’re likely planning to do some hiking. Long pants are best on the trail, since they’ll protect your legs from brush, bugs, and the sun. Nylon pants like these are perfect for hiking because they’re lightweight, dry quickly, and won’t rip if they get caught on something.
View on Amazon.com ➜

5) Sturdy sandals: Women’s and Men’s – A pair of sturdy sandals is convenient to have anytime you’re planning on being outdoors in warm weather. You don’t have to worry about getting them wet like regular shoes, and they’re not likely to fall off and float away like a flip-flop. Whether you’re planning on kayaking, boating, swimming, or just light hiking,put some sandals like these on your Yellowstone packing list.
View on Amazon.com ➜

6) Hiking shoes: Women’s and Men’s – To keep your feet happy on the trail in Yellowstone, pack a good pair of hiking shoes (just be sure to break them in first). While some people choose to hike in sneakers, hiking shoes like these provide more traction and better support, making you less likely to get injured on your trip.
View on Amazon.com ➜

7) Sarong – A sarong is always a useful travel item, especially if you’re spending time outside. In Yellowstone, a sarong can easily be used as a picnic blanket, towel, or shawl – plus they’re cheap and they dry quickly.
View on Amazon.com ➜

8) Daypack – No matter what your travel style is, a daypack is one of the essentials to take to Yellowstone. Whether you’re out on the trail, the lake, or just a bus tour, you’ll need to be able to carry things like water, snacks, your camera, and a jacket. This 18-liter pack from Osprey will take up almost no space in your bag but is big enough to hold everything you’ll need for a day in the park.
View on Amazon.com ➜

9) Water bottle – Visiting Yellowstone means spending a lot of time outsides – and that means carrying water with you, especially if you’re doing something active like hiking. Carrying a reusable bottle like this one, which you can keep refilling in the park, will save you money over buying bottled water every day – and it will create less plastic waste for the park to dispose of.
View on Amazon.com ➜

10) Sunscreen – If you’re visiting in the summer, sunscreen will be one of your Yellowstone packing essentials. A water- and sweat-resistant formula like this one is ideal if you’ll be hiking, kayaking, or swimming in the park.
View on Amazon.com ➜

11) Insect repellent – For summer visits, insect repellent is also one of the top things to bring to Yellowstone. You’re sure to encounter mosquitoes and other bugs if you’re hiking or camping –and you’ll seriously regret it if you don’t have a way to keep them at bay.
View on Amazon.com ➜

12) Hand sanitizer – Hand sanitizer is a good idea for any hiking or camping trip. While the visitors’ centers and restaurants in Yellowstone have bathrooms and sinks where you can wash your hands, you’ll be on your own in the backcountry or if you want to stop for a snack out on the trail.
View on Amazon.com ➜

13) First-Aid kit – To make sure you’re prepared, a First-Aid kit needs to be on your packing list for Yellowstone. When you’re out on the trail, you’ll want to be able to tend to things like blisters or cuts right way, so make sure you have some bandages, antibiotic cream, and alcohol wipes, at the very least.
View on Amazon.com ➜

14) Camera – Yellowstone is full of iconic and stunning scenery, so make sure you have a camera that will do it justice. The Canon PowerShot is a popular one among travelers because it’s not as expensive or bulky as a DSLR, but will capture higher-quality shots than your phone.
View on Amazon.com ➜

15) Memory card – Of course, a camera is no good without a memory card – an item that gets forgotten all too often. Make sure you get one large enough to hold the many, many pictures you’ll end up taking in Yellowstone.
View on Amazon.com ➜

16) Quick-dry towel – You’ll need to bring a towel if you’re planning to camp or just want to take a dip in one of Yellowstone’s swimming holes, but leave the bulky bath towel at home. Quick-dry towels are much better for travel because they’re lightweight and take up very little space (and, of course, dry quickly).
View on Amazon.com ➜

17) Sleeping bag – For visitors who enjoy nature and don’t mind roughing it, camping is a key part of the national park experience. If that’s you, a sleeping bag will be one of the essentials to take to Yellowstone. Just be sure to bring one that’s rated to the temperatures you’ll be experiencing, and don’t forget a sleeping pad to go with it.
View on Amazon.com ➜

18) Water filter – There’s no shortage of water sources in Yellowstone, but you’ll need to treat any water collected in the park before you drink it. While there are a few different options for water purification, most hikers prefer using a filter like this one.
View on Amazon.com ➜

19) Pocketknife – If you’re planning to camp, a pocketknife should also be on your list of things to take to Yellowstone. A knife will be useful for preparing food, splitting branches, cutting rope, and many other tasks you’ll need to do at a campsite.
View on Amazon.com ➜

Other packing list items to consider for Yellowstone National Park:


What should I wear in Yellowstone?


The best clothes to wear in Yellowstone will depend heavily on what time of year you’re visiting and what you’re planning to do in the park. During the summer season, the temperatures usually call for warm-weather clothing during the day, especially at lower elevations. On many days in the summer, shorts and t-shirts will be the most comfortable choice. However, the weather is unpredictable (yes, it sometimes snows in July) and it’s much cooler at higher elevations, so it’s important to be prepared for anything. Even in the summer, make sure to pack some long pants, a fleece jacket or sweatshirt, and rain gear. You may want some flip-flops for wearing around your hotel or campsite, but your main shoes for Yellowstone should be sturdy, whether it’s hiking shoes for the trail or water sandals for kayaking.

During the winter, even the highs are usually below freezing, so your clothing for Yellowstone will need to be warm and windproof if you visit between November and March. A sweat-wicking base layer, a warm mid-layer, and a waterproof outer layer will keep you comfortable no matter what you’re doing in the park. For activities like cross-country skiing or snowshoeing, you’ll probably want a pair of snow pants. During this time of year, a pair of gloves, a hat, and a scarf or neck gaiter should also be part of your Yellowstone wardrobe, as should wool socks and waterproof boots.

What NOT to take to Yellowstone


1) 🚫 DON’T BRING fancy clothes – People come to Yellowstone to experience the outdoors, so there’s no need for dressy clothes.
2) 🚫 DON’T TAKE unnecessary valuables – There’s always a small chance that things will get lost or stolen on the road or damaged by the elements. Unless it’s something you’ll need on your trip (like a camera), leave your valuables at home.
3) 🚫 DON’T PACK a bath towel – Regular bath towels are notoriously large and bulky, and will be provided by your hotel anyway. If you’re going to be camping in the park or plan to go swimming, opt for a quick-dry towel.
4) 🚫 DON’T BRING books – Physical books are heavy and will take up a ton of space in your bag. If you think you’ll want to do some reading during your trip, bring a Kindle instead.
5) 🚫 DON’T PACK lots of clothes – Most people tend to pack more clothes than necessary when traveling, and just end up having heavy luggage to haul around. Only bring as many outfits as you’ll realistically wear during the trip.
6) 🚫 DON’T TAKE gear you could rent – While you’ll need specific gear for many activities in Yellowstone, much of it can be rented there. Don’t buy a bunch of new gear to bring if you don’t need to.

10 frequently asked questions about Yellowstone National Park


1) Is Yellowstone accessible year-round?

You can visit Yellowstone any time of year, but you’ll have a very different experience in the winter than in the summer.The season in which all of the parks roads and amenities are fully open is actually extremely short – only July and August, which are the most popular months to visit. However, many of the roads, campgrounds, visitors’ centers, shuttles, and other amenities operatefrom April to November. Between December and March, most things in the park are closed, with the exception of two of the lodges, a few visitors’ centers, and a series of warming huts. During these months, the only road open to regular traffic is the one from the northeast entrance to Mammoth Hot Springs. You can still snowshoe and cross-country ski in the park during these months, and guided snowmobile and snowcoach tours take visitors to areas unreachable by road.

2) Are bears a problem in Yellowstone?

Both black bears and grizzly bears live in and around Yellowstone, and seeing one is not unlikely. However, very few people get injured by bears in the park (over 90 million people visited between 1980 and 2011, and only 43 bear-related injuries were reported). Your chances of an unwanted encounter with a bear are higher when hiking in the backcountry, so make noise on the trail and carry bear spray in remote areas.

3) Where should I stay around Yellowstone?

There are nine lodges inside the park, of which two (Old Faithful Snow Lodge and Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel) are open year-round,while the others close from late-fall to early-spring. The park also has twelve main campgrounds (with sites for both tents and RVs), five of which can be reserved in advance. There are over 300 backcountry campsites as well, which have limited amenities and are only accessible by foot.

Many visitors prefer to stay outside the park’s boundaries, and a range of accommodations is available in West Yellowstone, Gardner, and Cooke City (all in Montana). Slightly farther away are Cody, WY and Island Park, ID, both of which offer some of their own attractions. Lastly, many choose to bookend their trip to Yellowstone with a couple days in either Bozeman, MT or Jackson, WY.

4) What are the best hikes in Yellowstone?

With over 1,300 miles of hiking trails, Yellowstone has more hikes than you could count. A few very short hikes in the park lead to stunning viewpoints, including the popular Uncle Tom’s Trail (which is mostly a steep staircase) and the aptly-named Observation Point Trail. Other short, easy hikes include the Natural Bridge Trail, Storm Point Trail, and Elephant Back Loop Trail. Some of the park’s best longer and more strenuous hikes are Lava Creek Trail, Mount Washburn Trail, Purple Mountain Trail, and Avalanche Peak Trail.

5) What are the top things to do in Yellowstone?

If you’re a nature lover, you’ll never get bored in Yellowstone. Some of the must-sees in the park include Old Faithful, Mammoth Hot Springs, Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, Yellowstone Lake, and the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. The 1,300 miles of trails make hiking one of the top activities in Yellowstone, andfishing, kayaking, and boating trips are also popular. Several companies run bus tours of the park, offering top-notch sightseeing. During the winter, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing are the best ways to get active, and snowmobile and snowcoach tours take visitors into parts of the park that aren’t otherwise accessible in the off-season.

6) What’s the best time of year to visit Yellowstone?

The best time to visit Yellowstone depends on what you want to do there, but the most popular time is during July and August – the only months when all roads and amenities in the park are fully operable. During May and October, most of the park is still open and easily accessible, but the crowds are smaller, making these the ideal months for visiting. Of course, if you’re interested in cross-country skiing and snowmobiling, or just seeking some peace and quiet, a winter visit to Yellowstone might be for you. You’ll have the park mostly to yourself and get to see it in its untouched glory.

7) What kind of wildlife live in Yellowstone?

No matter what time of year you visit Yellowstone, you’re nearly guaranteed to see some wildlife – and probably a lot of it. In fact, the park is home to nearly 70 different mammals and over 300 species of birds.Among the most interesting to visitors are black bears, grizzly bears, bobcats, cougars, bison, moose, bighorn sheep, elk, and mountain goats. Bird enthusiasts will appreciate the wide variety of bird species in Yellowstone, including bald eagles, peregrine falcons, trumpeter swans, and ravens.

8) How can I see Old Faithful?

Of the nearly 500 geysers in Yellowstone, only six erupt on a predictable schedule – and Old Faithful is easily the most famous one. It goes off about every 90 minutes, and you can check the eruption schedule at the visitors’ center. Benches are set up near Old Faithful for easy viewing, or you can make the 1.1-mile hike up Observation Point Trail for a bird’s-eye view of the eruption. The geyser area can get busy in the afternoon, but eruptions in the morning and evening are less crowded (and have unobstructed views).

9) Are there any safety concerns in Yellowstone?

There aren’t too many health or safety issues in Yellowstone beyond the risks inherent with any outdoors activity. However, one of the most important things is to obey all signs and stay on the trails or boardwalks around geothermal features. Venturing into prohibited areas or attempting togo for a soak in the hot springs (which is illegal and known as “hot-potting”) can be fatal. Visitors to Yellowstone should also be aware of bears, especially in the backcountry. Hike in groups of three or more if possible, and be on the lookout for signs of bear activity (tracks, scat, and evidence of feeding). Making noise on the trail will likely be enough to ward them off, but you should also carry bear spray in case you do encounter one. You can also find out about recent bear activity from one of the visitors’ centers or other park offices.

When you’re out in Yellowstone, it’s also important to carry sufficient water (and purify the water you collect in the park). Bring a First-Aid kit with you, and be sure to wear sunscreen and insect repellent in the summer and warm clothing to prevent frostbite or hypothermia in the winter.

10) How can I save money while visiting Yellowstone?

It’s easy to spend a small fortune on luxury lodges and adventure activities in Yellowstone, but a few budget-friendly choices can help make your trip much more affordable. Not surprisingly, camping is much cheaper than staying in a hotel – but if roughing it isn’t your idea of a good time, you can still save by choosing a budget hotel in a nearby town like over the lodges inside the park. There are also plenty of affordable Airbnb rentals around the park, on both the Montana and Wyoming sides. Similarly, while the park has many places to eat, the food tends to be expensive, and you’ll save a bundle by packing your own lunch and enjoying a picnic.If you’ll be flying to Yellowstone, compare prices among the nearby airports (Jackson Hole, Bozeman, Billings, and Idaho Falls) to find the best deal.

While there are an abundance of activities and tours to choose from in Yellowstone, it’s easy to fill your days for free without missing out on too much. You can always explore the park on your own, and many believe that’s the best way to see it. Visiting the famous attractions like Old Faithful and Mammoth Hot Springs doesn’t cost anything, nor does hiking its top-notch trails. There are also free ranger programs and campfire talkson offer during the summer.


Top